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Portion of Pike Street to close for US 33 Northern Connector project

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

On Monday, April 3rd, Rieth-Riley Construction will close Pike St. between Chicago Ave. and 2nd St. to begin phase 1 of the Pike St. widening work. Both Chicago Ave. and 2nd St. will remain open. Access to all businesses and residences will be maintained. A signed access route will be posted for... more

Sewer Department camera truck gets new look

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

In recognition of World Water Day the City of Goshen Stormwater Department would like to announce the new look for the Sewer Department’s Camera Truck. This stormwater message reminds those who see it that each of us has a role to play in preventing stormwater pollution. Remember “Only Rain Down... more

Mayor Stutsman announces Year of Goodness

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Mayor Jeremy Stutsman is proud to designate March 2017 through March 2018 as the Year of Goodness in Goshen. This Year is a way to remind residents of all the great things that happen in our community. During this Year Mayor Stutsman will recognize individuals, organizations and businesses that... more

Upcoming Events All Events »

Board of Public Works & Safety & Stormwater

Monday, April 3, 2017, 2:00pm

City Council

Tuesday, April 4, 2017, 7:00pm

First Fridays - Downtown Goshen

Friday, April 7, 2017, 5:00pm

Join family and friends in downtown Goshen. Each month offers exciting events and entertainment.

Stormwater Management

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Welcome to the Goshen Department of Stormwater Management

Over time trash, grass clippings, and sediment can accumulate around a storm drain inlet and cause drainage issues.

The Department of Stormwater Management is part of the Goshen Engineering Department and is located at 204 East Jefferson Street, Goshen, Indiana, which used to be the old Goshen High School.

The Goshen Department of Stormwater Management works daily to prevent polluted stormwater runoff from impacting our natural water resources by working closely with a variety of other public and private partners within the City of Goshen, Elkhart County, and the State of Indiana.

The goal for the management of stormwater is "Clean Water for Everyone". In order to get there, the Department of Stormwater Management provides education and opportunities for the public to be involved, identifies and addresses illicit discharges to the storm sewer system or our local waterways, monitors construction sites and newly developed areas for stormwater compliance, and makes sure the City conducts operations and maintains its facilities in a manner that does not introduce pollution into our own local waterways.

What is Stormwater?

Stormwater is water from snow and ice melting, as well as rainwater from storms. When rain or melting snow and ice fall or flow across natural surfaces like forests and grassy areas, most of it will soak into the soil. When it lands on streets, parking lots, and other hard surfaces, it runs off to another location like a storm drain or a local waterway.

What is Stormwater Pollution?

As stormwater flows (or snow melts), it picks up debris (such as trash, grass clippings, etc.), chemicals (such as fertilizers and pesticides), sediment, and other pollutants. This "contaminated" water then enters a storm sewer system and is eventually discharged to a local wetland, stream, or river.

Why is Stormwater Pollution a Concern? 

Within the City of Goshen and other urban areas, stormwater runoff comes from yards, roofs, driveways, parking lots, construction sites, and streets (these are all called hard surfaces except for yards), and flows into miles of storm sewers, swales, and ditches located under or next to our City streets and eventually reaches our local waterways. Stormwater picks up oil, grease, sediments, automotive fluids, trash, lawn chemicals, and other pollutants that are harmful to the environment and is often discharged/released to our local waterways untreated. Untreated stormwater affects our ability to use our local water bodies for drinking, fishing, and recreational purposes and it degrades fish and other aquatic habitats. The only way to lessen stormwater pollution is to reduce the amount of pollutants washed away by stormwater.


For more information on the origins of the Department of Stormwater Management and the Staff, click here.

Recent Stormwater News

  • Stormwater is an important resource for our local waterways but we need to handle it correctly or it can severely damage those waterways it flows into. (March 28, 2017)
  • Trees are important to our daily lives in many ways from removing CO2 from the air, collecting water when it rains, and cooling the ground. Scientists are calling for more attention to be paid to the impact trees can have on climate change. (March 21, 2017)
  • The Federal Government is looking to spend 1 trillion dollars on infrastructure and EPA Director Scott Pruitt wants the infrastructure plan to include stormwater drains and pipes in addition to sanitary sewer and drinking water infrastructure. (March 7, 2017) 
  • Local communities in Goshen, IN, and Ann Arbor, MI, deal with inadequate drainage by constructing stormwater detention basins. (February 16, 2017)
  • California's drought is being quenched but the greater-than-normal rainfall is causing some major erosion issues. Highways are being washed away and the Oroville Dam north of Sacramento is in danger of failing, causing 188,000 people to evacuate. These are great and scary reminders of the power of water. (February 14, 2017)
  • The most common pieces of trash found on Lake Michigan beaches are cigarette butts, takeout containers, straws, and water bottles. The good news is they are from local sources if we all pitch in to keep trash out of our local waterways we won't have to share our beaches with trash! (February 14, 2017)
  • Stormwater used to be seen as a nuisance but now it is being seen as a resource, which means we need to rethink how we handle stormwater runoff. Instead of piping it to local waterways we need to allow it to soak into the ground. (February 3, 2017)
  • Los Angeles County, California, has captured 22 billion gallons of stormwater this rainy season (since mid-October) and allowed it to soak into the ground. Unfortunately, 58% of California is still experiencing drought conditions. (January 27, 2017)
  • Recent warm weather and decaying plant matter is the source of foam on the St. Joseph River near South Bend. (January 26, 2017)
  • During the winter months, street and highway departments across the nation spread thousands of tons of salt to roadways to keep them ice free. But all of this salt is harming the environment and communities are beginning to use alternatives to salt. The City of Goshen applies salt, sand, and BOOST. Find out more here. (January 17, 2017)

For additional stormwater and water quality related news visit the Stormwater News Archive.

Stormwater Toolbox Newsletter

March 2017: Spills happen sometimes when fueling your vehicle so check out this month’s Stormwater Toolbox Newsletter for a few tips on what to do if you find yourself in a spill situation. You can also participate in Mayor Stutsman’s Year of Goodness by picking up trash or by adopting a storm drain.

February 2017: In this month's Newsletter find out what steps to follow on small construction projects to prevent stormwater pollution and learn about what can and cannot be dumped down a drain (storm, kitchen, and bathroom).

January 2017: A tradition at the beginning of a new year is to make resolutions on how to improve your life. It is also a great time to refresh your memory on different topics. This month's Newsletter (Spanish) offers a chance for you to refresh your memory on why the City of Goshen is an MS4. Additionally, you can find out who the 2016 Stormwater Hunter of the Year is. Finally, the Greater Elkhart County Stormwater Partnership is looking for pictures for the 2018-2019 Elkhart County Waters Calendar.

December 2016: The holiday season is upon us and you might be trying to find that perfect gift for a loved one but don't forget to also think about what to do with the stuff being replaced. Find out why it is important to and how to properly dispose of electronic waste in this month's Newsletter. Additionally, find out why food and beverage packaging is a major source of waterborne trash and how to reduce it. 

November 2016: Winter is coming and those areas of bare soil need some cover. Learn more about why any cover is better than none. The Great Lakes are a wonderful treasure but we are filling them with an unknown plastic pollutant: microfibers. Find out more in this month's Newsletter (Spanish). 

To see past Stormwater Toolbox Newsletter Click Here.

Upcoming Meeting Dates

  • Goshen Stormwater Board - Every Monday at 2:00 pm in the Police/Courts Building (111 East Jefferson Street)
  • MS4 Advisory Board - Tuesday, April 18th at 1:00 pm at the Elkhart County Public Services Building (4230 Elkhart Road, Goshen, IN 46526)
  • Partnership Stormwater Board Meeting - Monday, April 24th at 9:00 am at the County Administration Building (117 N. Second Street, Goshen, IN 46526)

Ordinances