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Public Notice on Proposed Local Limits Modification for City of Goshen Wastewater Treatment Plant

Friday, May 26, 2017

The City of Goshen Wastewater Treatment Plant has submitted, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 5, 77 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60604-3590, has reviewed the draft report entitled “Goshen Local Limits Re-evaluation” and concurs with the conclusion of the report which recommends... more

GOSHEN HIGH SCHOOL ELECTS JASON BARAHONA AS 2ND YOUTH ADVISER TO CITY COUNCIL

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Goshen High School elected its new youth adviser during an election held Tuesday, May 23. Jason Barahona, who is now finishing his junior year, will be the youth adviser for the 2017-2018 school year. State law allows mayors to appoint a person younger than 18 years of age to serve as an adviser... more

Notice of Boil Order: New Street

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

NOTE: The Boil Water Advisory issued on May 23, 2017 has been cancelled.  The order was for the area of: On New Street from Clinton to Pike streets. Samples have been taken; test results are satisfactory, it is no longer necessary to boil your water. Thank you for your patience and for water conservation... more

Upcoming Events All »

MEMORIAL DAY

Monday, May 29, 2017

City offices will be closed on this day.

Goshen Housing Authority Board meeting

Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 7:00am

Board of Public Works & Safety & Stormwater

Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 11:00am

Stormwater Management

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Welcome to the Goshen Department of Stormwater Management

Over time trash, grass clippings, and sediment can accumulate around a storm drain inlet and cause drainage issues.

The Department of Stormwater Management is part of the Goshen Engineering Department and is located at 204 East Jefferson Street, Goshen, Indiana, which used to be the old Goshen High School.

The Goshen Department of Stormwater Management works daily to prevent polluted stormwater runoff from impacting our natural water resources by working closely with a variety of other public and private partners within the City of Goshen, Elkhart County, and the State of Indiana.

The goal for the management of stormwater is "Clean Water for Everyone". In order to get there, the Department of Stormwater Management provides education and opportunities for the public to be involved, identifies and addresses illicit discharges to the storm sewer system or our local waterways, monitors construction sites and newly developed areas for stormwater compliance, and makes sure the City conducts operations and maintains its facilities in a manner that does not introduce pollution into our own local waterways.

What is Stormwater?

Stormwater is water from snow and ice melting, as well as rainwater from storms. When rain or melting snow and ice fall or flow across natural surfaces like forests and grassy areas, most of it will soak into the soil. When it lands on streets, parking lots, and other hard surfaces, it runs off to another location like a storm drain or a local waterway.

What is Stormwater Pollution?

As stormwater flows (or snow melts), it picks up debris (such as trash, grass clippings, etc.), chemicals (such as fertilizers and pesticides), sediment, and other pollutants. This "contaminated" water then enters a storm sewer system and is eventually discharged to a local wetland, stream, or river.

Why is Stormwater Pollution a Concern? 

Within the City of Goshen and other urban areas, stormwater runoff comes from yards, roofs, driveways, parking lots, construction sites, and streets (these are all called hard surfaces except for yards), and flows into miles of storm sewers, swales, and ditches located under or next to our City streets and eventually reaches our local waterways. Stormwater picks up oil, grease, sediments, automotive fluids, trash, lawn chemicals, and other pollutants that are harmful to the environment and is often discharged/released to our local waterways untreated. Untreated stormwater affects our ability to use our local water bodies for drinking, fishing, and recreational purposes and it degrades fish and other aquatic habitats. The only way to lessen stormwater pollution is to reduce the amount of pollutants washed away by stormwater.


For more information on the origins of the Department of Stormwater Management and the Staff, click here.

Recent Stormwater News

  • Model My Watershed is a tool that allows a user to analyze data, model storms, and compare conservation and development scenarios in a watershed. It is free and can be used to see how a rain garden or a new parking lot will impact runoff and how water soaks into the soil. (May 23, 2017)
  • A 2016 USGS study showed the timely removal of leaf piles in the fall from urban streets can reduce harmful levels of phosphorus in stormwater runoff. (May 18, 2017)
  • Microplastics are an every water problem and it isn't just microbeads. Check out this article to find out more about the issue, how it has made its way into the aquatic food chain, and what you can do about it. (May 17, 2017)
  • South Bend looks to reduce combined sewer overflows to the St. Joe River by installing green infrastructure practices. (May 9, 2017)
  • Green infrastructure (rain gardens, pervious pavement, trees, etc.) can reduce combined sewer overflows by slowing down stormwater and soaking it up. Evansville, IN, and a number of other cities are doing just that and saving millions of dollars in the process. (April 25, 2017)
  • To protect the Great Lakes we need to watch how much fertilizer and pesticides we add to our lawns. If the fertilizers or pesticides do not have time to soak in or dry up before it rains they will be washed into the nearest storm drain or waterbody. (April 21, 2017)
  • Dispose of your medications properly to prevent them from entering our local waterways. Wastewater treatment plants are not able to remove medications before the water is released to the river. This is a global issue that is not very well understood and is being studied in the Hudson River. (April 17, 2017)
  • In the Great Lakes area where we live we have wonderful ground water sources but out west that is not always the case. No matter what city or town you live in though the large amounts of hard surface (pavement, rooftops, etc.) cause large amounts of stormwater to runoff into our local waterways. Thus, it is important to find ways to let more stormwater soak into the ground instead of pushing it downstream. Check out this article from L.A. for more information. (April 14, 2017)
  • The University of Minnesota released a study suggests that household fertilizer use and pet waste are the major sources of nutrients polluting the lakes, streams, and rivers around the Twin Cities in Minnesota. (April 13, 2017)
  • The three major pollutants in our waterways today are sediment (#1 by volume), E.coli/bacteria (#1 in Elkhart County), and nutrients (e.g. fertilizers). These three pollutants and other pollutants fluctuate over time and cause different water quality issues. The USGS just released a study and an interactive map showing water quality trends between 1972 and 2012. Check them out. (April 11, 2017)​

For additional stormwater and water quality related news visit the Stormwater News Archive.

Stormwater Toolbox Newsletter

May 2017: Sediment is a major pollutant in our waterways worldwide and we must do all we can to prevent it from getting there. One way to do this is to put inlet protection measures on storm drains and you can find out one method in this month's Newsletter. Another pollutant of concern is grass clippings and if they reach a storm drain they can create both water quality and drainage issues.

April 2017: When open dumpsters mix with rain or melting snow it results in something called "dumpster tea" and it is not something you want to drink or put into the environment. In this month's Stormwater Toolbox Newsletter, you will find what steps to take to make sure dumpster tea is not on the menu the next time you take out the trash. Also, read about the connection between the application of fertilizer and pesticides, and how they can negatively affect water quality. 

To see past issues of the Stormwater Toolbox Newsletter click here.

Upcoming Meeting Dates

  • Goshen Stormwater Board - Every Monday at 2:00 pm in the Police/Courts Building (111 East Jefferson Street)
  • MS4 Advisory Board - Tuesday, June 20th at 1:00 pm at the Elkhart County Public Services Building (4230 Elkhart Road, Goshen, IN 46526)
  • Partnership Stormwater Board Meeting - Monday, June 26th at 9:00 am at the County Administration Building (117 N. Second Street, Goshen, IN 46526)

Ordinances