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PIKE STREET (US 33) TO REOPEN FROM THIRD TO MAIN STREETS

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Rieth-Riley Construction will be ready to open Pike Street up between Third and Main streets Thursday afternoon, Oct. 19, after the signal work is completed. This is exciting news as it will open up another traffic pattern for the City and allow better access to the neighborhoods north of Pike... more

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Governing Body: Goshen Redevelopment Commission Date of Meeting: October 31, 2017 Time of Meeting: 3:00 p.m. Place of Meeting: Annex Conference Room, 204 East Jefferson, Goshen, IN Pursuant to the provisions of the Open Door Law and Indiana Code 5-14-1.5-5, the Goshen Redevelopment commission... more

TRICK-OR-TREAT HOURS

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

The City of Goshen's Trick-or-Treat hours will be 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 31. more

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Stormwater Information

Clean Water Act

The requirements the Goshen stormwater program is founded on, began in 1948 with the enactment of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. This act was amended in 1972, and today is commonly referred to as the Clean Water Act (CWA). There have been subsequent amendments since, but the core of the program remains focused on improving water quality by preventing the release of contaminates to waterways. For more information on the Clean Water Act, click here.


What do Rule 13 and MS4 mean?

327 IAC 15 – 13, or simply known as Rule 13, is the specific part of Indiana law that lays out the rules for cities and urbanized areas with a population density of 10,000 or more, but less than 100,000. Urbanized areas are required to obtain and maintain a stormwater permit from the state to regulate Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems, also known as an MS4. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) defines an MS4 as “a conveyance or a system of conveyances owned by a state, city, town, or other public entity that discharges to waters of the United States and is designed or used for collecting or conveying storm water.” But the term MS4 does not solely refer to municipally-owned storm sewer systems, but rather is a term with a much broader application that can include, in addition to local jurisdictions, state departments of transportation, universities, local sewer districts, hospitals, military bases, and prisons. An MS4 is not always just a system of underground pipes; it can include roads with drainage systems, gutters, and ditches.

The purpose of this rule is “to establish requirements for storm water discharges from MS4 conveyances so that public health, existing water uses, and aquatic biota are protected.” In order to meet the requirements of Rule 13, an MS4 community is required to implement six (6) Minimum Control Measures (MCMs), which are:

1.   Public Education & Outreach

Develop and initiate public education programs addressing the impacts of stormwater leaving our community. The Elkhart County Soil and Water Conservation District fulfills this program requirement on behalf of the MS4 Communities within Elkhart County.

2.   Public Participation & Involvement

Getting the residents and property owners involved in activities that promote clean-water practices. The Elkhart County Soil and Water Conservation District fulfills this program requirement on behalf of the MS4 Communities within Elkhart County.

3.   Illicit Discharge Detection & Elimination

Seeking out and eliminating sources of water pollution. The City of Goshen performs this task in-house. The streams and ditches within the corporate boundary of the City of Goshen have been walked and boated to identify each pipe and ditch outfall that represents a point source discharge. These discharge points have been photographed, GPS located, and cataloged. Discharge of water from these structures have been sampled 36-hours following a rain event and screened for color, smell, temperature, pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and E-coli. Discharge points with pollutants are sampled more frequently and the source of the pollutants are traced back to the source for corrective measures. Click the picture below to see a video describing what an illicit discharge is and why prevention is important.

4.   Construction Site Runoff Control

Ensuring that all construction sites are operated and maintained in such a way as to reduce or eliminate pollution leaving their sites. The Elkhart County Soil and Water Conservation District fulfills this program requirement on behalf of the MS4 Communities within Elkhart County.

5.   Post-Construction Runoff Control

Developing requirements of new development that promote clean water even after the construction is over. The City of Goshen Stormwater Department manages the post-construction program. As new developments are constructed, stormwater management plans are developed for the properties to follow. On a five (5) year cycle, the Goshen Stormwater Department checks in with each plan holder to verify they are following their stormwater plan and to make sure the original stormwater assets are still functioning as intended.

6.   Pollution Prevention & Good Housekeeping

Cities are responsible for conducting their operations and maintaining their facilities in a manner that does not introduce additional pollution into the stormwater system and waterways. The City of Goshen’s staff is regularly trained on best management practices to minimize stormwater pollution. With the update of the City’s street department facility and central garage, special site features have been added to eliminate or capture pollutants associated with heavy equipment and vehicle maintenance.